You've got to start somewhere. Let's start at the very beginning.
It's a very good place to start.

Doing my best to live (and laugh) in the present. Working mom. Girls on the Run Board Member. Northwestern and Kellogg alum. Aspiring runner. Sunday Puzzle player. WBEZ member. Kindle reader. Family historian and shutterbug. Plate spinner.

americanexpress:

10 Things to Stop Tolerating 

Featured on Forbes… Click here to read more

By , Lawyer turned stress & resilience expert on Forbes

Paula is a stress and resilience expert with popular blogs on The Huffington Post and Psychology Today. Paula has appeared on the Steve Harvey TV show and in numerous publications, most recently in Working Mother magazine. Paula writes about the science of happiness in her new e-book, “10 Things Happy People Do Differently.” To learn more, please visit her website

fastcompany:

The answer to getting more done and leading a balanced life isn’t in beating yourself up about ambitions.
We’ve entered a new paradigm. One in which women, particularly in the West, have greater opportunity than ever before and yet are feeling stressed out, anxious, and exhausted trying to cope with the pressure to succeed in all areas of life. Despite external success, many women have a feeling of not measuring up or being good enough. Other women are leaning in so strongly that they are burning out. It’s a catch-22: how do we lean in without burning out?
Research shows bright girls are particularly likely to see their abilities as innate and unchangeable, and they grow up to be women who are far too hard on themselves—women who will prematurely conclude that they don’t have what it takes to succeed in a particular arena and give up way too soon.
Our experience is that women blame themselves. Therefore, many women are reading Lean In and thinking “Oh, I guess I wasn’t leaning in hard enough, I need to push myself even more.”
Here are the tenets for how to lean in without burning out:
Read More>
fastcompany:

The answer to getting more done and leading a balanced life isn’t in beating yourself up about ambitions.
We’ve entered a new paradigm. One in which women, particularly in the West, have greater opportunity than ever before and yet are feeling stressed out, anxious, and exhausted trying to cope with the pressure to succeed in all areas of life. Despite external success, many women have a feeling of not measuring up or being good enough. Other women are leaning in so strongly that they are burning out. It’s a catch-22: how do we lean in without burning out?
Research shows bright girls are particularly likely to see their abilities as innate and unchangeable, and they grow up to be women who are far too hard on themselves—women who will prematurely conclude that they don’t have what it takes to succeed in a particular arena and give up way too soon.
Our experience is that women blame themselves. Therefore, many women are reading Lean In and thinking “Oh, I guess I wasn’t leaning in hard enough, I need to push myself even more.”
Here are the tenets for how to lean in without burning out:
Read More>

fastcompany:

The answer to getting more done and leading a balanced life isn’t in beating yourself up about ambitions.

We’ve entered a new paradigm. One in which women, particularly in the West, have greater opportunity than ever before and yet are feeling stressed out, anxious, and exhausted trying to cope with the pressure to succeed in all areas of life. Despite external success, many women have a feeling of not measuring up or being good enough. Other women are leaning in so strongly that they are burning out. It’s a catch-22: how do we lean in without burning out?

Research shows bright girls are particularly likely to see their abilities as innate and unchangeable, and they grow up to be women who are far too hard on themselves—women who will prematurely conclude that they don’t have what it takes to succeed in a particular arena and give up way too soon.

Our experience is that women blame themselves. Therefore, many women are reading Lean In and thinking “Oh, I guess I wasn’t leaning in hard enough, I need to push myself even more.”

Here are the tenets for how to lean in without burning out:

Read More>

A word on the ALS ice bucket challenge

I worked at a local ALS organization for several years. Lou Gehrig’s disease was a disease I had heard about, but knew nothing about. I quickly learned that a patient’s body stops working, but his/her mind stays totally alert. It starts with motor skills. It eventually expands to your organs, affecting eating and ultimately breathing. It’s fatal. There is no way to stop the progress of the disease.

It’s estimated that about 30,000 people in the US have the disease at any given time. It’s an orphan disease. Pharma doesn’t invest in it because there aren’t enough people who have it. There is limited other funding outside of private donations.

The ALS Association has raised over 23 million dollars to date. I would be willing to bet that over 30,000 people have donated to ALS to make that total. SO, IF my estimate is right, because of this challenge: more people have donated to ALS than actually have the disease. Let that sink in.

23 million dollars would allow EVERY SINGLE PERSON with ALS to have an in-home nurse to help with their breathing machine for over eight hours. Any family member of a person with ALS will tell you how impactful that would be on their lives, even if just for one day.

30,000 people. 23 million dollars and climbing. It’s time.