The Very Beginning

A very good place to start. Because you have to start somewhere.

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Raising a Moral Child

mommafessional:

Excellent article.

So much great stuff in here. Mostly about parenting, but applicable for life in general. Model the way.

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366 Plays

nprchives:

Research and Development intern Kat Arcement sends along this charming piece:

Want to learn how to answer the telephone, or how to answer the door, or how to be nice? In Chicago, a full two years before Ferris Bueller’s Day Off was released, you could if between the ages of 4-14 attend a class in manners. As Paula Person states, “I was rather tired with people saying children are horrible.”

 So are we, Paula Person. So are we.

(BTW, these kids are ADORABLE.)

I took this exact class in the early 80s with Paula Person! Still remember (and use) what I learned.

(via npr)

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Seth's Blog: Coming from "no"

The difficult task is to turn around a no.

Not, “no, I’ve thought about it, but I’m not interested,” but, “no, I feel like saying ‘no’, whatever you’re offering, the answer is no.”

If the fractious child or the skeptical prospect or the frightened boss is coming from a place of no, your proposal just isn’t going to work.

Shaking that rattle or waving that spreadsheet isn’t going to work, because it’s not going to be judged on the merits. The facts are irrelevant… if your partner (and yes, the person you’re with right now is your partner, engaged in a dance that will end with yes or no) is in search of a no, nothing is going to go right.

The best path, then, is to first work on the ‘no’. Not the pitch or the facts or the urgent thing you need approved right now. First, talk about the dance, and the goals, and how it feels to get to a yes.

Then tell me your story. 

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2013/12/coming-from-no.html

I really liked this post from Seth Godin’s blog

Before the holidays, I was talking with our team about the old sales tactic of turning a no into a yes. The advice I gave was to ask the person who was saying no, “Why do you care about us?” and then use THEIR story to tell OUR story.